The Institute of Materials Finishing -  the international institute for industrial and academic professionals in surface finishing and coating

Southern Branch News & Reviews

The Southern Branch of the Institute of Materials Finishing is going strong with some 30 to 40 attendees and exhibitors at each meeting.

The Branch holds approximately three to four events a year involving a wide range of technical, environmental and health and Safety topics including:
  • Mini evening symposia
  • Day symposia
  • Trouble-shooting clinics
  • Works tours and a
  • Social event

The Branch meetings also give the participants opportunities to network and obtain advice.

The last such event was on the 10th of November 2009 at ITT in Basingstoke, where some 35 people attended a full technical meeting with a tour, in two groups, of the plating shop and laboratory.

A general view of ITT’s Plating shop The test laboratory within the shop, with the sample analysis
and lab office areas in view
In addition, there was an exhibition by eight well-known suppliers of chemicals and equipment in the meeting room while the topic of the day was ‘Newer Technologies’ addressing some of the ways found to meet customers’ requirements and aspirations.

Lectures were given by:

Rob Wyatt of MacDermid on 1000 hour salt spray testing of Electroless nickel,
Dr Emma Smith of Leicester University on technology (Ionic Liquids) that appears to offer considerable benefits over aqueous plating and
Peter Jackson of Alan Technologies, who gave a paper on phosphate and Cr6+ coating alternatives

The next technical meeting, entitled ‘Greener and Leaner’, will be held on the 11th of March 2010 at BAE’s Social Club at BAE Systems (Insyte) Ltd in Portsmouth and will include an exhibition of small plating plant, chemicals and laboratory equipment, with lectures on the subjects of:

  • Environmental issues
  • Practical experience with ISO 14001 (Environmental) and ISO 18001 (Health and Safety) standards
  • Good operation of an effluent treatment plant
  • Sand filtration as a means of meeting effluent standards
The final Technical Meeting of the IMF Southern Branch session for 2009-2010 will be the full day symposium to be held at the Test Valley Golf Club near Basingstoke in Hampshire on the 12th of May 2010. The meeting’s themes involve saving costs via environmental changes, new chemistry and correct safe working; there will also be a lecture on understanding the true costs of running a business today (business OR charity!).

The Southern Branch – “Need to Paint your Wagon”

The Southern Branch of the IMF held a mini symposium entitled “Need to Paint Your Wagon” on Wednesday 5 October 2016 at Lloyd’s Register Global Technology Centre on the university campus in Southampton.

This was the very first venture for the IMF into Painting technology and was met with a little apprehension for all committee members but the idea was to promote the IMF as a “Materials Finishing” institute rather than just metal finishing (i.e. Electroplating et al.).

The subjects chosen for the evening were:
  • Super Yacht Finishing
  • Aerospace Coatings
  • Cycle Painting (Unfortunately cancelled)
  • Spray Painting Equipment.

Stuart Downie (Lloyds Register) presented Super Yacht Finishing.

These yachts range from 45 – 200 mtrs in length with prices up to $1 million per metre and as most of these Super Yachts are made from steel then painting is very important for corrosion protection.
These yachts tend to be “toys” for the wealthy and obviously paying such a high price for such a “toy” commands a high expectation for a superior paint finish.

Most paint colours are generally white/dark blue and the paint application must fit criteria such as mirror finish, smooth profile, and the highest possible gloss. Most importantly it should last a long time.

Comparing this with commercial ships these generally have a lower gloss, colour decided by the owner of the ship, and reasonable corrosion protection. Finish quality is not that important.

Also painting a Super yacht can be years compared to painting cars, which is relatively quick. In order to obtain the high quality it all comes down to the preparation which is broken down into: Filling and Fairing with epoxy materials, sanding, painting, sanding, painting for at least 5 - 6 coats and finally finishing with the “Ultimate Coat” which adds the superior gloss and also the expense.

The customer is looking for a finish that is highly reflective and totally free from blemishes, ripples and any surface defects and ultimately looks like a reflection from a highly polished mirror.

Our second speaker was Graham Armstrong from Indestructible Paints.
Indestructible Paints have been involved in the aircraft and aerospace industry for over 50 years and Graham discussed the applications that use these types of paints.

The most important thing for an aircraft is weight and getting the minimum amount of paint to give the maximum amount of corrosion protection is important and challenging.

An aircraft is built once but overhauled many times and the types of paints used are important because an “A.O.G” (aircraft on ground) costs money and therefore need to last.

Paints used are divided into Anti Corrosive Primers that are used on external surfaces and are generally 2 pack epoxy polyurethane finishes and on a large aircraft such as the A380 airbus can used as much as 5000 litres.
Finishing coats are hard 2 coat polyurethane types which are designed to last up to 7 years, they are generally metallic/pearl finishes that must have a flexible resistance and capable of taking bold designs such as aircraft logos.

The flexible finish paints must have good gloss retention and are used on the wings of the aircraft and again are designed to last at least 7 years.

Erosion resistant paints are used on propellers and they must stand rain and particle erosion and also aero engines which are low temperature/high temperature, require paints that have high corrosion resistance and low erosion. Engineering coating paints are used for wheels and brakes

Aircraft interiors are generally made from composite materials. These must be non-burning, non smoking types of materials and usually these are finished similar to the Super Yacht but not to quite the same degree.

Our final speaker was Steve Mannouch from Finishing Brands who supply paint equipment to the paint industry.

Finishing Brands develop and design equipment for the paint industry and Steve explained the basis of atomization and fluid dynamics by showing videos of how actual spray patterns and air movement away from the gun nozzle affect the final finish on the painted component.
By using this knowledge together with droplet size the distribution of paint can be seen.

Steve then went on to talk about “airless atomization” using hydraulic principles with high viscosity materials, “electrostatic” painting together with centrifugal atomization and electrostatic atomization.

The committee of the Southern Branch felt that the evening was a success and would like to thank Stuart Downie, Graham Armstrtong and Steve Mannouch for their time in the preparation and giving of the papers and to our exhibitors:

Finishing Brands
AGAS Electronic Materials
Metalor
Indestructible Paints
Institute of Materials Finishing

Further Information about the seminars can be found on the IMF website www.materialsfinishing.org. Recession special bargain attendance fee only £12 inc VAT! Payable on the day, please book in advance on attached form and email/send to:

The Southern Branch IMF
C/o Mr. N. J. Sawyer, ITT, Jays Close, Viables Industrial Estate, Basingstoke, Hampshire, RG22 4BA.
Fax: 01256 311 387
Email: nick.sawyer@uk.itt.com


“HEALTH, CHEMICAL SAFETY & the ENVIRONMENT”

Thursday, 3rd of November 2011
Plant Tour from 17:00 onwards
Technical session starts at 18:30

Venue:
The Plating Shop at
ITT Basingstoke, Jays Close, Viables Industrial Estate, BASINGSTOKE, Hampshire, RG22 4BA
Exhibition for Delegates
(included in the £12 charge)

AN EVENING SEMINAR

For more information, click below
Poster
Information Leaflet
Application form

Institute of Materials Finishing, Southern Branch
Seminar Report

Finishing Clinic, Exhibition and Tour

21 May 2009


Sub-titled “Old problems, New Technologies,” this event showcased a new format by the Southern Branch – a help clinic replaced the standard presentations, with the addition of an exhibition and tour. For delegates the event had no charge - a credit crunch special!

The event was held at the Broad Oak Social Club, Hilsea. Portsmouth

A total of thirteen exhibitors attended, the highest total for a long period for the Southern Branch. The full range of products and services was on show including cleaning processes and systems, analytical instrumentation, metal finishing processes and plant, health and safety equipment. The exhibitors were Accota, Alan Technologies, Ceemco, Dalic, Fischer Instrumentation, Fraser Technologies, PMD, Horiba, Metalor, Process Automation (Europe) Ltd, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Serfilco and Swift Industrial Supplies.

Analytical instrumentation included X - Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer used for coating thickness measurement and chemical analysis of materials and electroplating process solutions. Another instrument commonly used in the metal finishing industry is a UV-Vis Spectrophotometer used for the analysis of trade effluent. The instrument can analyse a wide range of species including heavy metals, organic and inorganic materials and parameters including chemical oxygen demand, cyanide and water colour using standard corvette test kits.

A number of electroplating process and plant suppliers exhibited. It was refreshing to note that a wide range of commercially finishes and electroplating plant are available to meet industrial needs despite the obvious economic conditions. A subject of intensive discussion was the use of trivalent chromium passivation as a replacement for the conventional hexavalent chrome finish. There is a lot of well presented information about the trivalent finish, however, it would appear that more performance data is required to convince the designers who attended the seminar.

Brush electroplating and anodising techniques were demonstrated including precious metals coating. These processes can be applied when “in situ” coating repair is necessary and where full component immersion for coating is not feasible.

Cleaning systems were another “hot topic” for the show particularly the replacement of trichloroethylene with new solvents and associated capital plant to ensure safety, health and environmental compliance. With chemical handling a baseline activity of the metal finishing industry, health and safety equipment was on show.

The tour consisted of a detailed visit to the Parylene Coating Facility and Analytical Laboratory at the adjacent Manufacturing site of BAE Systems Integrated System Technologies (Insyte).

Mr Keith Ford, Process Supervisor, gave a “colourful” outline of the parylene coating process (see photograph below). It is a robust polymer coating material used to uniformly protect materials and components for a wide range of applications e.g. electronics, aerospace, defence, and medical. The coating system on show was currently in use applying a conformal coating to printed circuit board products.

The many positive attributes of Parylene coatings were also described. Parylene has a unique property, in that coatings form a uniform thickness on all surfaces both “internal and “external.” Parylene coatings conforms to virtually any shape, including sharp edges, crevices, points; or flat and exposed internal surfaces. Parylene has a very low permeability to moisture, chemicals, and corrosive gases. The coating is applied using vacuum deposition techniques at ambient temperature. No solvents or catalyst materials are required. However, capital costs are relatively high to set up the process.



After the Parylene experience the Analytical Laboratory Tour was hosted by Mr Clive Arnold, Chief Chemist. The Laboratory provides a comprehensive “test house” capability particularly for surface coatings. X – Fluorescence Spectroscopy provides precision thickness measurement and chemical analysis for electroplated coatings. An example is the identification and differentiation of zinc and cadmium coatings on fasteners which have a very similar appearance. Incorrect identification still occurs in the supply chain.

The Laboratory undertakes process control for electroplating and associated processes involved in microelectronic circuit production and aluminium metalwork finishing. One relevant issue here is that digital titrators are used instead of a suite of standard burettes saving significant space.

Coatings can also be tested in terms of mechanical properties. A Micro Hardness System was shown which can undertake direct mico-hardness measurement of coatings on components and printed circuit boards rather than representative coupons with a duplicate coating in cross section. Examples include determination of microhardness for gold and hard anodised coatings. For comparison standard micro-hardness tests in cross section can also be undertaken.

A benchtop scanning electron microscope was also demonstrated. This instrument is the size of a benchtop fridge where the previous electron microscope was the size of a large desk.

The conventional cut up and look approach can be used with metallographic preparation and metallurgical microscopes. However, it has been found that the scanning electron microscope can be used in place of metallurgical microscopes for small samples when magnifications of up to 1000 x are required. An example electron microscope image is demonstrated below. A cross section of gold and electroless nickel on an aluminium alloy substrate is shown with coating thickness dimensions.



A radiographic facility is also located in the Laboratory. It has multiple applications for the internal inspection of aluminium castings, electronic components and assemblies.

Another X - Ray spectrometer is used for bulk materials and liquids assisting in the analysis of light metals, certification of liquid waste. Infra red techniques are used to identify organic materials.

A key overall point was that integration of the complementary analytical techniques enhanced the service provision. For example, particulate can be identified by chemical analysis with an X ray Fluorescence Spectrometer that can focus X rays on a spot i.e. 0.2 mm diameter. This can be followed by viewing the particle specimen on the electron microscope for physical characterisation and dimensional measurement.

Visitors remarked on the high standard of housekeeping in view of the historic perception is that laboratories are "dirty" places.

Along side the tours a new style Finishing Clinic was held. This involved qualified personnel providing “free” advice to delegates. Nick Sawyer (ITT, Canon) provided covered safety, health and environment issues, James Shelley (Farnborough Metal Finishing) presented practical energy saving, Clive Arnold (BAE Systems, Insyte) represented Quality and Laboratory analysis and Emily Gower, (BAE Systems Insyte), presented Hazardous Waste and Water Use.

However, the novel clinic format was perhaps too unusual and delegates did not arrive with the expected barrage of enquires - or were afraid to ask. Discretion was the better part of valour. Clearly, in future, sharing problems in front of commercial colleagues may require some “encouragement” for mutual benefit to be achieved.

Event was attended by over 40 delegates. Feed back was very positive. One delegate remarked “there is a lot of synergy in the hall,” from which we can all benefit. QED. Proceedings were finalised with a tasteful buffet.

The Southern Branch would like to thank all exhibitors, delegates, BAE Systems Insyte for making this event a success.

Clive Arnold
2 September 2009

SOUTHERN BRANCH

EXHIBITION & FiNISHING CLINICS

Thursday 21st May, 2009
14.00 to 19:00

Venue: Broad Oak Social Club, BAE Systems Ltd., (Insyte) Broad Oak, The Airport, PORTSMOUTH, Hants, PO3 5PQ,

Exhibition opens 14:00

OLD PROBLEMS, NEW TECHNOLOGIES!

16 Tables and Problem Solving booths

FREE EXHIBITION & PROBLEM SOLVING CLINIC !

SHE = Safety, Health and Environment:
Nick Sawyer (CMIOSH) ITT Basingstoke.
Practical Energy Saving
James Shelley Farnborough Metal Finishing
Quality/Laboratory Analysis and Materials
Clive Arnold (Lead Auditor) BAE Systems Integrated System Technologies
Hazardous Waste and Water Use
Emily Gower BSc (Chem: Eng) BAE Systems Integrated System Technologies
Precious Metal Plating
Mike Wild please see him on the Metalor stand

Please apply on the attached Application Form. More info here. No charge for delegates.

Note: The Analytical Laboratory Tour is for UK Citizens Only. Note: no application form, no tour.

Old Problems, New Technologies

Thursday the 21st of May 2009 at 14:30

PROGRAMME

14.00 – 14:30 Open and set up-free problem solving clinics and exhibition.
14:30 – 15:30 1st Tour of Analytical Lab & Parylene Coating Facility: continuing Clinics & Exhibition – SHE, Practical Energy Saving, Quality, Water, Waste + Filtration.
15:30 – 16:30 2nd Tour of Analytical Lab & Parylene Coating Facility: continuing Clinics & Exhibition.
17:30 – 19:00 Free Buffet, networking, discussions and finish.
EXHIBITORS BOOKED SO FAR:-
Fischer Instrumentation, Allen Technologies, Metalor., Acota Ltd, Serfilco, Metlab, Fraser Technologies, Cemco FSL, Horiba Scientific, Shawcity, PMD UK Ltd .

Please apply in advance so that numbers are known. This afternoon event is free but the Analytical Laboratory Tour is only for U. K. Citizens –Please apply on the attached form by Tuesday 19 May 2009.

Apply to
The Southern Branch IMF, C/o Mr. N. J. Sawyer, ITT, Jays Close, Viables Industrial Estate, Basingstoke, Hampshire, RG22 4BA.
Fax: 01256 311387
Email: nick.sawyer@uk.itt.com
Deadline for receipt of applications is Tuesday 19 May 2009 at 16.00 hrs

Aerospace and Maritime Finishing: Seminar Report

This event was held, with kind permission, at the Portsmouth premises of BAE Systems Integrated System Technologies Ltd on 15 November 2008.

Grit Blast and Paint Facility Tour
The event commenced with a tour around a new Grit Blast and Paint Facility operated by the above company. Tour guides were BAE System staff members Mr K Ford and Mr A Barnard.

The Facility is of a significant scale servicing large maritime and defence applications such as radars and antenna systems. A wide range of paints conforming to military specifications can be applied.

It has separate grit blast and paint spray booths. Each booth is 13 metres long by 6 metres in width. Height is 4.5 metres. Wow!

Full safety, health and environmental control systems are fully installed. Recycling is a high priority with grit blasting media and paint solvent being recycled.

“Tourists” commented positively on the facility, particularly the high standard of cleanliness and housekeeping.

Exhibition

A total of 12 exhibitors provided a wide range of interest in products and services. These included NADCAP, chemical analysis instrumentation, non destructive thickness measurement, laboratory supplies, water purification, portable brush plating technology, solvents and cleaning systems. Practical demonstrations included chemical analysis using X Ray Fluorescence Spectrometers and brush plating.

Presentations

All presentations were very well received by an enthusiastic audience of over 40 people as was the buffet afterwards

NADCAP: An Introduction: Nigel Cook PRI Europe

NADCAP is an acronym for the National Aerospace and Defence Contractors Accreditation Program. This is a world wide co-operative certification and standard setting scheme for aerospace and defence related industries to cover such specialised activities as chemical processing, coating (including electroplating) and inspection/testing systems.

Mr Cook provided a detailed introduction from audit, corrective action to accreditation with the “driver” of continued improvement and a cost effective consensus approach. Industry experts manage all key steps in the accreditation process.

Major aerospace prime contractors are members of the scheme which has a collaborative developmental approach between these prime contractors, NADCAP staff and suppliers to establish audit criteria.

A critical point is what are the benefits of certification? The straightforward answer is that NADCAP certified members report increased business activity and improvements in quality.

Experience in Implementing NADCAP: Seamus Bourke, Tecan

Mr Bourke provided a short report on “real” implementation experience at Tecan relating to their metal finishing service. A small team was instituted to amend company quality systems to meet the NADCAP audit checklist criteria and progress the project through to completion. A team approach is essential along with senior management commitment in terms of financial and manpower resources. In fact, a particular emphasis was the need for “total commitment” from “top to bottom” to achieve successful NADCAP certification.

NADCAP accreditation was successfully achieved which enhanced a demonstrable commitment to quality by the company.

Aerospace and Maritime Cleaning: Graham Frazer, Frazer Technologies

Mr Frazer reviewed the Solvent Emissions Directive and the resultant cleaning and equipment options for the industry. Essentially these are aqueous or solvent based cleaning processes.

An interesting point was that aqueous process can require five times as much energy to operate a specific cleaning process due to increased thermal capacity properties compared to solvents. All that additional energy costs money!

Cleaning system equipment options were considered e.g. upgrade or buy new along with the availability of improved solvent products which have improved safety and environmental characteristics.

Compliance with the Solvent Emissions Directive is essential and careful investigation is required to determine suitable cleaning options for aerospace and maritime applications, balancing the need for environmental compliance and cleaning performance.

Chrome free Aluminium Conversion Coatings: John Yates, McDermaid

Mr Yates compared traditional chromate conversion coatings with a non-chrome process, explaining how the elimination of chromium affects the application and use of aluminium conversion compounds. Major issues were described including coating characteristics, ageing, application methods, solution parameters, and salt spray results.

Chrome free conversion coatings are clear to blue in appearance and RoHS compliant. Application methods for both coating types are similar e.g. immersion, brush methods. However, operating conditions are different e.g. chrome free coatings have longer dip times (3-10 minutes) and are less acidic. Drying temperatures are also higher at 100 Deg C compared to below 70 Deg C for Chromates. Resultant chrome free conversion coatings are cured as formed and are not heat sensitive.

Chromate conversion coatings contain a Class 1 carcinogen and are not RoHS compliant. Coatings have a clear to yellow colour and require time for curing and are heat sensitive.

Both coatings provide surface electrical resistance and corrosion resistance properties and can be utilised as paint pre-treatments.

*************************************************************

IMF Southern Branch would like to thank all tour guides, speakers and exhibitors for their contribution to this well received and successful event.

Clive Arnold, Chairman, IMF Southern Branch

Aerospace and Maritime Finishing: Seminar Report

This event was held, with kind permission, at the Portsmouth premises of BAE Systems Integrated System Technologies Ltd on 15 November 2008.

Grit Blast and Paint Facility Tour The event commenced with a tour around a new Grit Blast and Paint Facility operated by the above company. Tour guides were BAE System staff members Mr K Ford and Mr A Barnard.

The Facility is of a significant scale servicing large maritime and defence applications such as radars and antenna systems. A wide range of paints conforming to military specifications can be applied.

It has separate grit blast and paint spray booths. Each booth is 13 metres long by 6 metres in width. Height is 4.5 metres. Wow!

Full safety, health and environmental control systems are fully installed. Recycling is a high priority with grit blasting media and paint solvent being recycled.

“Tourists” commented positively on the facility, particularly the high standard of cleanliness and housekeeping.

Exhibition

A total of 12 exhibitors provided a wide range of interest in products and services. These included NADCAP, chemical analysis instrumentation, non destructive thickness measurement, laboratory supplies, water purification, portable brush plating technology, solvents and cleaning systems. Practical demonstrations included chemical analysis using X Ray Fluorescence Spectrometers and brush plating.

Presentations

All presentations were very well received by an enthusiastic audience of over 40 people as was the buffet afterwards

NADCAP: An Introduction: Nigel Cook PRI Europe

NADCAP is an acronym for the National Aerospace and Defence Contractors Accreditation Program. This is a world wide co-operative certification and standard setting scheme for aerospace and defence related industries to cover such specialised activities as chemical processing, coating (including electroplating) and inspection/testing systems.

Mr Cook provided a detailed introduction from audit, corrective action to accreditation with the “driver” of continued improvement and a cost effective consensus approach. Industry experts manage all key steps in the accreditation process.

Major aerospace prime contractors are members of the scheme which has a collaborative developmental approach between these prime contractors, NADCAP staff and suppliers to establish audit criteria.

A critical point is what are the benefits of certification? The straightforward answer is that NADCAP certified members report increased business activity and improvements in quality.

Experience in Implementing NADCAP: Seamus Bourke, Tecan

Mr Bourke provided a short report on “real” implementation experience at Tecan relating to their metal finishing service. A small team was instituted to amend company quality systems to meet the NADCAP audit checklist criteria and progress the project through to completion. A team approach is essential along with senior management commitment in terms of financial and manpower resources. In fact, a particular emphasis was the need for “total commitment” from “top to bottom” to achieve successful NADCAP certification.

NADCAP accreditation was successfully achieved which enhanced a demonstrable commitment to quality by the company.

Aerospace and Maritime Cleaning: Graham Frazer, Frazer Technologies

Mr Frazer reviewed the Solvent Emissions Directive and the resultant cleaning and equipment options for the industry. Essentially these are aqueous or solvent based cleaning processes.

An interesting point was that aqueous process can require five times as much energy to operate a specific cleaning process due to increased thermal capacity properties compared to solvents. All that additional energy costs money!

Cleaning system equipment options were considered e.g. upgrade or buy new along with the availability of improved solvent products which have improved safety and environmental characteristics.

Compliance with the Solvent Emissions Directive is essential and careful investigation is required to determine suitable cleaning options for aerospace and maritime applications, balancing the need for environmental compliance and cleaning performance.

Chrome free Aluminium Conversion Coatings: John Yates, McDermaid

Mr Yates compared traditional chromate conversion coatings with a non-chrome process, explaining how the elimination of chromium affects the application and use of aluminium conversion compounds. Major issues were described including coating characteristics, ageing, application methods, solution parameters, and salt spray results.

Chrome free conversion coatings are clear to blue in appearance and RoHS compliant. Application methods for both coating types are similar e.g. immersion, brush methods. However, operating conditions are different e.g. chrome free coatings have longer dip times (3-10 minutes) and are less acidic. Drying temperatures are also higher at 100 Deg C compared to below 70 Deg C for Chromates. Resultant chrome free conversion coatings are cured as formed and are not heat sensitive.

Chromate conversion coatings contain a Class 1 carcinogen and are not RoHS compliant. Coatings have a clear to yellow colour and require time for curing and are heat sensitive.

Both coatings provide surface electrical resistance and corrosion resistance properties and can be utilised as paint pre-treatments.

*************************************************************

IMF Southern Branch would like to thank all tour guides, speakers and exhibitors for their contribution to this well received and successful event.

Clive Arnold, Chairman, IMF Southern Branch



Institute of Materials Finishing
SOUTHERN BRANCH

RESOURCE CONSERVATION

A summary of the symposium held on the 25th April 2007 at the Intech Science Park, Winchester, Hampshire. The symposium was well attended with 30 delegates.

The 4 speakers were well received and after they had delivered their papers a lively answer and question session ensued, followed by a buffet.

Sludge Recycling - Steve Waite - World Resources Company.
There followed from Steve Waite a full and comprehensive paper listing the reasons for re-cycling, the benefits to industry and the environment, he then detailed the global nature of the company, how it was founded in 1996 going into production in 1999. The process was then explained from pick up in the UK, transfer to Germany, material analysis, preparation, processing and distribution to the smelters. The whole process is 100% recyclable and has Global ISO certification.

Bio Cleaners – Sascha Wegner – Enthone – Cookson
This paper was presented in a full and comprehensive way by Sascha Wegner. He listed the existing high temperature aqueous systems and compared them to a low temperature Bio system (45C) plus air agitation.Wegner pointed out that Bio- cleaners were used with emulsifiable oils, but were not suitable for polishing compounds, high viscosity oils, chlorinated oils and biocides.
Conclusions: Almost indefinite cleaner life, low temperature and reduced heating costs. Pre treatment being the largest contributor to the energy bill

Water Treatment for the Recycling of Process Rinse Waters. – Tony Mitchelmore. - Wychwood Water Treatment Systems Ltd.
Why recycle water? Mitchelmore produced the following reasons: To reduce costs and save water being the principle. It cost approximately £1-50 to buy and discharge a cubic metre of water. By using deionised water during rinsing this can promote a stain free appearance; better quality rinse water will help adhesion. Reducing industrial water consumption will aid in conserving resources and lessen the damage to water courses etc. Methods of recycling were discussed including a recycling deionisation system and reverse osmosis. Water suitable for recycling should have low level suspended solids, no appreciable turbidity otherwise a particulate filter would be required. Installation costs could be paid back within 1 year.

Envirowise Software Programme for the Conservation of Water and New Ideas in reducing Water Consumption. – David Hemsley. – Marquis Associates, Woking David gave the delegates a description of the Envirowise Platewise Tool, cited the PPC regulations and said that serious water conservation in the metal finishing industry had only happened in the last 15 – 20 years, he then gave examples of plating companies that had embarked on water management programmes. David gave two examples. Case (A) whose consumption of water was reduced from 40m3 per day to 8 – 10m3 per day with the installation of cascade rinsing and an evaporator. Case (B) A Cadmium plating plant down to 26L of water per hour of which 12L per went back to the plant and 14L per hour passed to the evaporator.

The authors may be contacted for a copy of there individual papers.

This was the my last symposium as chairman of the Southern Branch, I would like to thank present and past members of the Committee for there help and support during the previous three years.

David Colwell MIMF (Chairman Southern Branch)


RESOURCE CONSERVATION

A summary of the symposium held on the 25th April 2007 at the Intech Science Park, Winchester, Hampshire. The symposium was well attended with 30 delegates.

The 4 speakers were well received and after they had delivered their papers a lively answer and question session ensued, followed by a buffet.

Sludge Recycling - Steve Waite - World Resources Company.
There followed from Steve Waite a full and comprehensive paper listing the reasons for re-cycling, the benefits to industry and the environment, he then detailed the global nature of the company, how it was founded in 1996 going into production in 1999. The process was then explained from pick up in the UK, transfer to Germany, material analysis, preparation, processing and distribution to the smelters. The whole process is 100% recyclable and has Global ISO certification.

Bio Cleaners – Sascha Wegner – Enthone – Cookson
This paper was presented in a full and comprehensive way by Sascha Wegner. He listed the existing high temperature aqueous systems and compared them to a low temperature Bio system (45C) plus air agitation.Wegner pointed out that Bio- cleaners were used with emulsifiable oils, but were not suitable for polishing compounds, high viscosity oils, chlorinated oils and biocides.
Conclusions: Almost indefinite cleaner life, low temperature and reduced heating costs. Pre treatment being the largest contributor to the energy bill

Water Treatment for the Recycling of Process Rinse Waters. – Tony Mitchelmore. - Wychwood Water Treatment Systems Ltd. Why recycle water? Mitchelmore produced the following reasons: To reduce costs and save water being the principle. It cost approximately £1-50 to buy and discharge a cubic metre of water. By using deionised water during rinsing this can promote a stain free appearance; better quality rinse water will help adhesion. Reducing industrial water consumption will aid in conserving resources and lessen the damage to water courses etc. Methods of recycling were discussed including a recycling deionisation system and reverse osmosis. Water suitable for recycling should have low level suspended solids, no appreciable turbidity otherwise a particulate filter would be required. Installation costs could be paid back within 1 year.

Envirowise Software Programme for the Conservation of Water and New Ideas in reducing Water Consumption. – David Hemsley. – Marquis Associates, Woking
David gave the delegates a description of the Envirowise Platewise Tool, cited the PPC regulations and said that serious water conservation in the metal finishing industry had only happened in the last 15 – 20 years, he then gave examples of plating companies that had embarked on water management programmes. David gave two examples. Case (A) whose consumption of water was reduced from 40m3 per day to 8 – 10m3 per day with the installation of cascade rinsing and an evaporator. Case (B) A Cadmium plating plant down to 26L of water per hour of which 12L per went back to the plant and 14L per hour passed to the evaporator.

The authors may be contacted for a copy of there individual papers.

This was the my last symposium as chairman of the Southern Branch, I would like to thank present and past members of the Committee for there help and support during the previous three years.

David Colwell MIMF (Chairman Southern Branch)

Clive Arnold MIMF
Chief Chemist

BAE Systems Integrated System Technologies Ltd
Broad Oak Business Park
The Airport
Portsmouth
Hampshire
PO3 5PQ

Tel: 02392 226128/6601 (Voicemail Facility)
Fax: 02392 226824 or 02392 226001
e-mail: clive.arnold@baesystems.com

RoHS COMPLIANCE

A Synopsis

This symposium with laboratory tour and exhibition was held with kind permission at BAE Systems Technologies Ltd, Broad Oak, The Airport, Portsmouth, Hants. 19th October 2006

There were 4 papers presented. Due to illness Roger Lawson, Schloetter, had to withdraw and Nick Sawyer stepped into the breach at very short notice.
There was also a tour of the lab and the effluent system.

RoHS - A challenge to the Aerospace Industry and its supply chain.
Dr David Andrews (Technical Manager) BAE Systems Shared Services. Product Assurance Response Centre. (PARC)

This paper presented by Dr Andrews pointed out the pitfalls of supplying the aerospace industry, the military and the domestic market. With lead, cadmium, hexavalent chrome etc being banned under RoHS companies supplying the aerospace industry had to apply for exemption. The services and aerospace still want lead in their solder joints and hexavalent chrome passivation on their cadmium plating. But problems arise when the same component is supplied to both them and for domestic consumption. One batch RoHS compliant, the next batch exempted this could lead to problems with the mixing of components and traceability. The solution would appear to be to convince the services to become RoHS compliant.

Zinc Alloys as an alternative to Cadmium
Maurice Pye (Technical Specialist) MacDermid

Maurice presented this paper in a systematic and logical way, arguing the pros and cons of the different alloys as an alternative to cadmium. Since cadmium has been banned under the RoHS regulations zinc–cobalt has been a widely used substitute but the corrosion resistance is not on par with cadmium, also there is the threat of cobalt being included in the E.C. hit list of banned metals in the future.
Pye talked about the merits and disadvantages of other zinc alloys, zinc-aluminium, zinc-iron, tin-zinc the firm favourite being zinc-nickel. The full list and details may be obtained from the author
Zinc-nickel came out as the favourite because of its excellent corrosion resistance (Up to twice that of comparable cadmium deposits, especially in a salt spray test.)

RoHS and WEEE Update
Nick Sawyer ITT Basingstoke

A big thank you to Nick for stepping in at the last moment, this paper was an update of the paper that he gave at Intech, Winchester earlier in the year. He once again illustrated the confusion that reigns over these regulations, with examples from home and abroad with a clear and in places a humorous paper, highlighting the exemptions that apply to the military and in certain cases the auto-motive industry.

Fasteners- A cautionary tale
CliveArnold (Chief Chemist) BAE Systems Insyte Portsmouth
This paper from Clive detailed the problems he and his team had encountered during the switch over from cadmium to zinc as a finish for fasteners due to the RoHS regulations. Not only had they encountered parts that had been zinc plated over the existing cadmium deposit, but parts that were plated from contaminated zinc baths with the deposit containing cadmium. Methods of detection were illustrated e.g. XRF, SEM, and chemical analysis.

There followed a question and answer session and buffet
The Chairman and Committee would like to thank BAE Systems for providing the excellent facilities and Clive Arnold for organising the event.
Full details of all the papers may be obtained from the respective authors.

David Colwell (Chairman)
Institute of Materials Finishing
SOUTHERN BRANCH

IMPLEMENTING ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION

The Inside Story and Experiences As Told by Members of the Industry

The symposium was held on the 15th March 2006 at the Intech Science Park, Winchester.

The delegates had the opportunity to peruse the exhibition before the symposium, which was well attended with 30 delegates, with Barry Gay amongst them. The committee thanks him for attending.

This is a brief summary of the 4 papers that were presented that evening. The full details of the papers may be obtained from the authors via Nick Sawyer who will pass on their details to anybody requiring them.

IPPC presented by Lyndon Daniels of Hawker Pacific,

This paper spelled out the problems of implementation and the programme of continuous improvement that has to be maintained. The policy at this plant is zero discharge and all waste is tankered away. So to reduce the amounts being taken away a programme of recycling and evaporation has been introduced. Another part of the programme has been the introduction of computerised information points on the shop floor for the operatives. This gives them access to drawings and specifications etc.

ISO 14001 presented by Clive Arnold BAE Systems Product Assurance.

This paper was paper illustrated with examples of the tasks that have to be undertaken to gain ISO 14001 and the introduction of a programme of continuous improvement. Targets being set by the head of the project and the Inspector. Arnold gave several examples during his paper. The installation of a more efficient effluent system because of lower discharge limits. A reverse osmosis water purification plant instead of the traditional D.I. plant thus eliminating the streams of concentrated acid and alkaline produced during regeneration. It was also illustrated that it is important to build up a relationship with the inspector during the implementation of ISO14001.

WEEE and RoHS -What are they. The implications for the plater N.J. Sawyer ITT Basingstoke.

For the uninitiated WEEE and RoHS are two European directives. The paper outlined the possible effects and issues.

WEEE = Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment.

Who is responsible for it, the consumer, the retailer, the wholesaler or the manufacturer.

There is still confusion and the paper illustrated many examples. California in fact was one of the first places to introduce WEEE only for utter confusion to break out with retailers being swamped with unwanted electrical goods. Governor Arnie has since suspended WEEE until there is a clearer definition of responsibility.

RoHS = Restriction of Hazardous Substances.

Mercury, Cadmium and Lead for example. But this ban only applies if the product containing these substances is for use in the domestic market. Applications for exemptions are being made all the time eg Military, Aviation and even sections of the Automotive industry.

VOC Regulations - Cleaning alternatives. Graham Fraser Cleaning Technologies

Volatile Organic Compounds. (VOC)

The Solvent Emission Directive will reach the statute books in 2007. This paper outlined the alternative to VOCs such as Trichloroethane. Aqueous and alternative solvent degreasing methods were discussed.

Aqueous plus ultrasonic either batch or continuous cleaning.

The equipment needed for these methods was also illustrated.

Organic solvents with low emissions were discussed. These compounds can be kept in check with a refrigerated plant and do not need extraction, they may be used with ultrasonics. The type of equipment needed for this process was illustrated.

Including distillation techniques for the recovery of soiled solvent.

The Southern Branch committee would like to thank the speakers for their contributions
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